coastal british columbia  

Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide (Brooke George Trail)  
- photos & guide by Lonny Barr  


Lonny at the Summit - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide (Brooke George Trail)

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Klitsa Above Sproat Lake - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Klitsa Above Sproat Lake
Brooke George Trailhead - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Brooke George Trailhead
Old Growth - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Old Growth
Small Lake - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Small Lake

Info:

Worn in Trail through the Alpine - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Worn in Trail through the Alpine
Mt Gibson - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Mt Gibson
Mt Gibson and the KlitsaGibson Plateau - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Mt Gibson and the KlitsaGibson Plateau
Route up to the Summit - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Route up to the Summit

Remarks:

Scramble to the Summit - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Scramble to the Summit
Lonny and Troy at the Summit - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Lonny and Troy at the Summit
Nahmint Valley and Nahmint Mountain - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Nahmint Valley and Nahmint Mountain

Mt. Klitsa is like a giant pyramid looming over Sproat Lake and is visible from a lot of areas in Port Alberni and the Alberni Valley. It is the second highest peak surrounding the Alberni Valley. Although it isn’t as high as Arrowsmith, it receives a lot more snow and remains snow-covered until much later in the summer. This is where the mountain gets its name, “Kleet-sah”, which is the aboriginal word for “always white”. Surprisingly, Klitsa’s summit receives only a fraction of the visitors that Mt. Arrowsmith gets.

The route from Nahmint has been there for years, and was recently named “The Brooke George Trail” in honour of a well-respected member of the Alberni Valley Outdoor Club. The trailhead has a beautiful wood sign that was placed there in 2008 by members of the AVOC. The route is somewhat grown-in in the early sections, but is well flagged and basically follows along the east side of a river coming down from the plateau. This early section of the trail winds upwards through some beautiful old growth, and arrives at a small lake after about 45 minutes.

When you arrive at the lake, make sure you turn right and head north along the east side of the lake (the summit can be seen due east from the lake). From here the route starts climbing into the alpine and you begin to get views of the beautiful lakes that are spotted all over the Klitsa/Gibson Plateau. As the trees thin out, the flagging becomes replaced by worn trails and rock cairns, and you can see the summit lying ahead of you due east. There are probably several different ways you could climb up to the summit, with different gulleys etc. We followed a fairly worn in path, which avoided some of the more scrambly sections and loose rock.

As you gain the summit, you are rewarded with a great view of Sproat Lake and the Alberni Valley to the east. Looking from south to west provides views of Nahmint, 5040, Adder, Steamboat, and Pogo. To the north you can see the peaks of southern Strathcona; Nine Peaks, Big Interior, Mt. Septimus and The Red Pillar/Comox Glacier. On a clear day you can even see the Golden Hinde and Elkhorn in the distance. There is an old brass canister with a summit register to sign in the Cairn at the top before heading back down.

KlitsaGibson Plateau from the Summit - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
KlitsaGibson Plateau from the Summit
Troy on the Edge - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Troy on the Edge
Klitsa Map - Mt. Klitsa Trail Guide by Lonny Barr
Klitsa Map

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